Skip to the content

 Apprenticeships

The aim  is to help  employers, parents, carers, managers, potential candidates, careers advisors, teachers and lecturers understand and to be able to answer questions around how to find, engage and support Apprenticeships.

The information for employers:

  • How to employ an Apprentice to grow their Business
  • How to develop their current workforce through training from the Apprenticeship portfolio
  • To explain how to navigate the funding
  • To give some tips on choosing the training provider for your Apprentice

Information for candidates - new recruits or established colleagues - 

  • Choosing the Apprenticeship that suits your hopes
  • Applying for an Apprenticeship role
  • What to expect when enrolled on an Apprenticeship

Supporting information for  Training Hubs: 

  • Supporting your Primary Care colleagues in developing their colleagues
  • Identifying possible Apprenticeships
  • Choosing a Training Provide
  • Understanding the funding

Apprenticeships 

Apprenticeships are not new, they have been an option for 100s of years as a way for the novice to learn from the experienced experts in the workplace. Passing on or learning new skills, knowledge and work place behaviours that bring benefits to the apprentice or skilled professional and to the employer, business owner or team manager.

Apprenticeships are jobs with matching training.

Apprenticeships are not new, but apprenticeship reforms in England have opened up new opportunities for employers in the health sector, which they are actively embracing. We are seeing large numbers of employers, public and private providers engaging in the reforms extensively and willingly, and they are discovering new ways to utilize apprenticeships for the regulated professions.

Individual employers will each have their own reasons for engaging with apprenticeships for the regulated professions. For some it will be widening participation, offering career progression to existing employees, for others it will be a recruitment and retention tool for hard-to-fill posts. Some will see it as a chance to mentor and shape the individual in-line with their organizational culture.

The Apprenticeship engagement activity across North West London is focused on attracting new participants into Primary Care, retaining and developing the current workforce. 

The employment of Apprentices across all functions within Primary Care is anticipated to add to the skills base within the sector. 

To start an Apprenticeship, you’ll need to be:
  • 16 or over
  • living in England with the correct right to work status
  • not in full-time education
  • already in work and your employer is willing to support you in getting involved in further study. The job role you hold needs to reflect the Apprenticeship you wish to undertake.  You must also be able to demonstrate that you would be learning new and significantly different knowledge and skills. 

You can apply for an apprenticeship while you’re still at school but you’ll need to be 16 or over by the end of the summer holidays to start the apprenticeship.

How Apprenticeships Work:

Apprenticeships combine practical training in a job with study.

As an apprentice you’ll:

  • be an employee earning a wage and getting holiday pay
  • work alongside experienced staff
  • gain job-specific skills
  • get time for training and study related to your role (at least 20% of your normal working hours)

Apprenticeships take 1 to 5 years to complete depending on their level.

There are over 750 Apprenticeship Standards to choose from for the full range go to  Apprenticeship-standards  The NHS has been a proactive employer and has been involved in the development of circa 350 of the Apprenticeship Standards.  The Standards is the name for the Apprenticeship qualifications. 

The Standards are written by employers, for employers. In this way the content reflects the real world; the skills, knowledge and behaviors required to survive and thrive in a chosen sector. 

The content is very often endorsed by the professional body and candidates can often receive the additional recognition of membership or registration from these organisations.  For example, the Chartered Manager Institute and the Institute for Leadership and Management both recognise the Apprenticeship for Departmental and Operational Managers (Level 5) and candidates can elect to undertake these qualifications as an integral part of their Apprenticeship. 

Non-clinical, professional qualifications are available through the Apprenticeship offer.  As well as a range of Clinical options.

Levels of study as an Apprentice

Apprenticeships have equivalent educational levels.

 

Level

Equivalent educational level

Intermediate

2

GCSE

Advanced

3

A level

Higher

4,5,6 and 7

Foundation degree and above

Degree

6 and 7

Bachelor’s or master’s degree

Some apprenticeships may also give you an additional qualification, such as a diploma or professional body qualification.

Apprenticeship-standards 

Information for Employers

Step 1:

Identify the job role that needs to be filled.

Write a job description and Person Specification to capture the activities that are required and the characteristics of the intended recruit. 

The content of this document will be used to steer the choice of the Apprenticeship Standard.  It is essential there is a close match between the job role activity and the content of the Apprenticeship Standard.  The experience of the candidate to the full range of the Standard within the day job will allow the successful completion and achievement of the overall programme. 

Step 2:

All training providers are required to be registered on the Register of Approved Training Providers   register of training providers - RoATP .  Only providers on this register are entitled to deliver Apprenticeships and receive funding from the Apprenticeship Levy and/or the Education and Skills Funding Agency. 

Training providers tend to specialise in industry sectors.  There are specialists in the Digital sector, finance, health, engineering etc.  Some have mixed portfolios and are able to offer generic programmes as well as their sector specialism.  This mostly occurs for Business Administration, Customer Services and Management programmes. 

All training providers are rigorously scrutinised by the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills known as OfSTED.  The Education sector’s equivalent of the CQC. 

Each training provider is required to make data returns to the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA).  This is a Government Agency, part of the Department of Education and the funding managers.  Every participating learner had a financial value.  Each Apprenticeship Standard has a designated monetary value.  The Training Providers are enabled to draw down this funding by supplying Individual Learning Records for the individuals undertaking training. 

These records are scrutinised and audited on an annual basis.  Random learners are selected and the training provider is required to offer up all the evidence from recruitment, on programme in learning, to achievement data to validate the existence and ongoing engagement of an individual.  At this point all the contractual requirements are checked.  No evidence, the funding can be ‘taken back’ in the very worst cases the registration can be withdrawn and learners removed. 

In this way the allocation and use of public funds is safeguarded. 

Selection criteria:

Can the training provider offer what you want?

Do they have a positive track record?

Do they have a high achievement rate?

What do other employers say about them?

Have they got a successful OfSTED report?

Step 3:

When an Apprenticeship Standard is approved for delivery they are assigned an agreed cash value.  This is based on the activity and content of the Standard and is signed off by the Minister for Education. All Apprenticeship Standards are developed via a Trailblazer group made up if industry specialists, curriculum experts, training providers and members of the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education.  The industry specialists, employers being the main influence guiding the content and various levels of the Standard. The assigned value is the total amount of funding that can be drawn down for the delivery of an Apprenticeship.  If for any reason a training provider wishes to charge more the additional fee will need to be funded from a different source.

Government Guidance on Funding for Apprenticeships

Tuition fees:

The agreed value includes the tuition fee and approximately 20% of this total is expected to be used to cover the cost of the End Point Assessment. 

The tuition fees for Levy payers:

Government guidance on the Apprenticeship Levy

If your organisation has a pay roll in excess of £3 million per annum you will be paying this tax.  This will be held in an account for your organisation to deploy when your current or new colleagues embark on an Apprenticeship. 

Apprenticeship Levy:

The Apprenticeship levy affects UK employers in all sectors with an annual pay bill in excess of £3 million. It is estimated that less than 2% of UK businesses are subject to the levy. All businesses with a UK pay bill above £3,000,000 per annum are required to pay the levy, regardless of whether they make use of the funding available for apprenticeships.

The levy is charged at a rate of 0.5% of an employer’s full UK pay bill and will be paid to the HMRC through the PAYE process alongside tax and NICs.

Levy Paying Employers

Your organisation will have calculated whether it needs to pay the levy, and will have included it in the usual PAYE payment to HMRC.

To be able to pay for apprenticeships your organisation also needs to register for the Digital Apprenticeship Service to manage apprenticeship funds online. An employer is able to pay for apprenticeship training and assessment via this account. The government will apply a 10% top-up to the funds you have deposited in your account.

If you don’t have enough funds in your account to pay for apprenticeship training, you must pay 5% of any outstanding balance. The government will pay the remaining 95%, up to the funding band maximum allocated to the apprenticeship you have chosen. If you exceed the funding band maximum, you will need to pay all the additional costs.

Tuition fees for smaller organisations/employers who do not pay the Levy

Smaller organisations, that do not pay the apprenticeship levy share the cost of training and assessing their apprentices with the government. This is called ‘co-investment’. As a smaller employer, you can pay for apprenticeships by registering with the Digital Apprenticeship Service and creating an account. The government is aiming that all employers regardless of size, should be registered on the Apprenticeship Service by early 2021.

For new apprenticeships you pay 5% towards the cost of apprenticeship training. The government will pay the rest (95%) up to the maximum funding band of the apprenticeship you have chosen. Should the cost exceed the funding band maximum, the additional cost will need to be paid by your organisation. You will pay 5% contribution to your training provider over the duration of the apprenticeship training.

Levy Sharing:

In some instances your Training Hub lead will be able to arrange a Levy Sharing Partner to pay the tuition fee.

National Insurance savings

All employers are exempt from paying employer class 1 National Insurance contributions for apprentices under the age of 25 on earnings below £827 a week (or £43,000 per annum). For example, this means that employers who have an apprentice aged 21 to 24 paid at real living wage would save around £2,000 in National Insurance contributions over the course of a 12-month apprenticeship.

To be eligible for exemption, your apprentice must be on a government approved apprenticeship standard.

Training costs for small employers:

If your organisation has less than 50 employees, it could be eligible for additional funding and support.

Employing an apprentice who is aged 16 to 18, or an apprentice aged 19 to 24 who is a care leaver or has an EHCP, will enable your organisation to 100% of your training costs will be paid by the government.

Employer Incentives:

Different incentive payments are available from time to time.

Currently  (September 2021) all employers regardless of size, will receive £3,000 for taking on an apprentice that is new to the organisation.

Employers will receive this payment in two instalments via your training provider who receive the instalments from the government and then forward on. The first payment will be available after the apprentice has completed 90 days of the apprenticeship and the second instalment will be available after the apprentices has completed 365 days.

Apprenticeship Service

These payments are made after you add new apprentices to your Apprenticeship Service (AS) account. Eligibility criteria for the payments for your apprentice will vary and you must have registered for a AS account. Guidance on signing up for the Apprenticeship Service.  This service was once known as the Digital Apprenticeship Service – DAS.  The Apprentice’s email address is required when setting up this account. 

You’ll receive the payment in 2 equal instalments: 50% after the apprentice completes 90 days of their apprenticeship and the remaining 50% after 365 days. To get the full payment, the apprenticeship must last for at least one year. The payment is different to apprenticeship levy funds and you can spend it on anything to support your organisation’s costs.

There will be no limit on the number of incentive payments that an employer can claim for apprentices eligible to receive funding, provided each apprentice meets the criteria, including being a new employee.

 

Step 4:

It is essential that there is a clear and purposeful job role that needs to be filled. 

Employers are required to ensure that the Apprentice will be supported by co-workers.  For clinical roles the range and nature of this support is set out by the professional organisations including the NMC.

The Job Description needs to be aligned to the selected Apprenticeship Standard.

The candidate can be anyone over 16 years old.

New or an existing member of staff.

If you are hoping to recruit to an entry level job role it will be important to consider adjusting your interview questions.  This is to reflect the different range of experiences the candidate may have to draw on in their answers.

Training Providers can often support you to find candidates to interview. 

You can also advertise your role on the Find an Apprenticeship site which you can access once you have registered on the Government Apprenticeship Service.

Find an Apprentice

Liaising with your Local Authority Apprenticeship team can also be a good starting place for finding local young people to consider as candidates. 

Functional Skills qualifications:

Every Apprentice is required to evidence they have achieve a Level 2 Qualification in English and Math's before they can complete and achieve an Apprenticeship Standard at Level 3 or higher.

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/2019.01.04-HEE-English-and-Maths-Guidance-v6.pdf

Step 5:

Training Providers are expected to gain employer commitment to supporting any Apprentices within their organisation.  In smaller organisations this will usually be the immediate line manager or the Senior Leader. 

A new Apprentice has much the same needs as any new appointee. 

  1. Schedule regular 1-2-1s, give them feedback and social pointers.
  2. Create a warm and welcoming culture.
  3. Help them to establish their new role.
  4. Delegate work to make their apprenticeship manageable.
  5. Communicate with the wider team to set expectations.

However, you may need to allow more time in terms of support or performance management in the early stages if you are recruiting an individual who is new to the adult world of work.

Managing an Apprentice

Employer commitment statement:

Government template for Employer Commitment Statement

This link takes you to the guidance regarding to scope of the Employer responsibilities.  All Training Providers will have their own version of this document.  This process is commonly and online service with a e-DocuSign facility. 

The main features for an Apprenticeship are:

  • Providing a safe working environment
  • Ensuring reporting on Health and Safety/Equality and Inclusivity are made clear and accessible
  • Line management and support are explained and understood
  • Time to focus on their study is made available – 20% of paid working time is the minimum requirement

Time to study

The legal requirement for an Apprentice is to be enabled to spend 20% of their paid working hours to attend to their learning.  This time needs to be allocated in a flexible pattern to suit the delivery of the knowledge and skills. 

For more information go to Time to Study.

Step 6:

Most Apprenticeship Standards have an externally assessed process to sign off the achievement of all aspects of the skills, knowledge and behaviours by the candidate.

In some higher level, Degree Apprenticeships the end point assessment is integrated into the University processes for judging success and are a part of the delivery of the University degree.

End Point Assessment organisations are required to be independent of the training providers.  As with the training providers each organisation needs to be on the approved register of EPAs:

End Point Assessment Organisations

Employers are expected to select they own choice of EPAO.  In practice most employers take guidance from their  training provider on this aspect of the process. 

Each Apprentices Standard has its own format for this assessment process.  Typically it will include a presentation on an aspect of the programme.  This is a chance for the candidate to demonstrate their development and learning.  This may be based on their portfolio of evidence drawn from all the activities from their experience.  

Some assessments include a multiple choice questions test, some practical scenarios to demonstrate how the candidate would approach the task.

Most include a professional discussion with an expert for the field to explore the work the candidate is involved in.  It’s a moment where the candidate can ‘show off’ their skill, knowledge and behaviours and how far they have journeyed!

Candidates are required to pass all aspects of the assessment to be able successfully achieve the Apprenticeship.

There is the opportunity to achieve a Merit or Distinction as a pass grade.

Tuition fees for smaller organisations/employers who do not pay the Levy

Smaller organisations, that do not pay the Apprenticeship Levy share the cost of training and assessing their apprentices with the government. This is called ‘co-investment’. As a smaller employer, you can pay for apprenticeships by registering with the Digital Apprenticeship Service and creating an account. The government is aiming that all employers regardless of size, should be registered on the Apprenticeship Service by early 2021.

For new apprenticeships you pay 5% towards the cost of apprenticeship training. The government will pay the rest (95%) up to the maximum funding band of the apprenticeship you have chosen. Should the cost exceed the funding band maximum, the additional cost will need to be paid by your organisation. You will pay 5% contribution to your training provider over the duration of the apprenticeship training.

Levy Sharing:

In some instances your Training Hub lead will be able to arrange a Levy Sharing Partner to pay the tuition fee.

National Insurance savings

All employers are exempt from paying employer class 1 National Insurance contributions for apprentices under the age of 25 on earnings below £827 a week (or £43,000 per annum). For example, this means that employers who have an apprentice aged 21 to 24 paid at real living wage would save around £2,000 in National Insurance contributions over the course of a 12-month apprenticeship.

To be eligible for exemption, your apprentice must be on a government approved apprenticeship standard.

Training costs for small employers:

If your organisation has less than 50 employees, it could be eligible for additional funding and support.

Employing an apprentice who is aged 16 to 18, or an apprentice aged 19 to 24 who is a care leaver or has an EHCP, will enable your organisation to 100% of your training costs will be paid by the government.

Employer Incentives:

Different incentive payments are available from time to time.

Currently  (September 2021) all employers regardless of size, will receive £3,000 for taking on an apprentice that is new to the organisation.

Employers will receive this payment in two instalments via your training provider who receive the instalments from the government and then forward on. The first payment will be available after the apprentice has completed 90 days of the apprenticeship and the second instalment will be available after the apprentices has completed 365 days.

Apprenticeship Service

These payments are made after you add new apprentices to your Apprenticeship Service (AS) account. Eligibility criteria for the payments for your apprentice will vary and you must have registered for a AS account. Guidance on signing up for the Apprenticeship Service.  This service was once known as the Digital Apprenticeship Service – DAS.  The Apprentice’s email address is required when setting up this account. 

You’ll receive the payment in 2 equal instalments: 50% after the apprentice completes 90 days of their apprenticeship and the remaining 50% after 365 days. To get the full payment, the apprenticeship must last for at least one year. The payment is different to apprenticeship levy funds and you can spend it on anything to support your organisation's costs.

There will be no limit on the number of incentive payments that an employer can claim for apprentices eligible to receive funding, provided each apprentice meets the criteria, including being a new employee.

The legal requirement for an Apprentice is to be enabled to spend 20% of their paid working hours to attend to their learning.  This time needs to be allocated in a flexible pattern to suit the delivery of the knowledge and skills. 

 How is Off-the-job training defined ?

‘learning which is undertaken outside of the normal day to-day working environment and leads towards the achievement of an Apprenticeship.’

The off-the-job training must be directly relevant to the Apprenticeship standard and could include the following:

Includes:

 

Off-the-job training does not include

The teaching of theory (for example: lectures, role playing, simulation exercises, online learning or manufacturer training

 

English and maths (up to level 2) which is funded separately

Practical training: shadowing, mentoring, industry visits and attendance at competitions

 

Progress reviews or on-programme assessment needed for an Apprenticeship standard

Learning support and time spent writing assessments/assignments

 

Training which takes place outside the Apprentice’s paid working hours

Apprentice Agreement:

Individuals embarking on an Apprenticeship are also required to formally express their commitment.

Apprentice Commitment Statement

Again on the Government template the list of responsibilities is outlined –

  • The Apprentice will be proactive and actively engaged in managing their own learning
  • The Apprentice will attend all learning sessions as required by their programme

Both these documents are a legal requirement and Training Providers are audited on their processes for the implementation of these arrangements. 

Every Apprentice is required to evidence they have achieve a Level 2 Qualification in English and Maths before they can complete and achieve an Apprenticeship Standard at Level 3 or higher.

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/2019.01.04-HEE-English-and-Maths-Guidance-v6.pdf

 Information for Apprentices 

Step 1:

Where to start?

Identify the job role that you might be interested in.

Take the NHS Quiz:

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/findyourcareer

This will help to identify what you might be suited to.

Already Employed: If you are already in a job and want to develop your career you will need to discuss this with your Manager or senior colleague.  Your day job needs to reflect the content of the Apprenticeship you wish to undertake.  Sometimes the current role does not have the scope, or range of activities required.   This can often be overcome by working with your manager to adjust or sometimes increase the range of activities you undertake. 

Step 2: Find a job:

To be an Apprentice you need to be employed.  So it’s imperative you have a job.

  1. There are several ways to do this.

Go to the Government website where loads of opportunities are advertised:

https://www.gov.uk/apply-apprenticeship

or

If you are focussed on the NHS go to

https://www.jobs.nhs.uk/xi/search_vacancy/

or

Check out the Training Providers in your area.

The local FE Colleges or Independent Training Providers will often have introductory programmes to support people in finding employment

Or

Look into the support your Local Authority (Council) or Job Centre Plus  can offer

Or

Approach local employers and ask if they have any roles that might suit you as an Apprenticeship.  If you choose this route make sure you have worked out what it is you are looking for and have the Apprenticeship Standard/s you are hoping to pursue.

How Apprenticeships work

Apprenticeships combine practical training in a job with study.

As an apprentice you’ll:

  • be an employee earning a wage and getting holiday pay
  • work alongside experienced staff
  • gain job-specific skills
  • get time for training and study related to your role (at least 20% of your normal working hours)

Apprenticeships take 1 to 5 years to complete depending on their level.

There are over 750 Apprenticeship Standards to choose from for the full range go to  Apprenticeship-standards  The NHS has been a proactive employer and has been involved in the development of circa 350 of the Apprenticeship Standards.  The Standards is the name for the Apprenticeship qualifications. 

The Standards are written by employers, for employers. In this way the content reflects the real world; the skills, knowledge and behaviors required to survive and thrive in a chosen sector. 

The content is very often endorsed by the professional body and candidates can often receive the additional recognition of membership or registration from these organisations.  For example, the Chartered Manager Institute and the Institute for Leadership and Management both recognise the Apprenticeship for Departmental and Operational Managers (Level 5) and candidates can elect to undertake these qualifications as an integral part of their Apprenticeship. 

Non-clinical, professional qualifications are available through the Apprenticeship offer.  As well as a range of Clinical options.

Levels of study as an apprentice

Apprenticeships have equivalent educational levels.

 

Level

Equivalent educational level

Intermediate

2

GCSE

Advanced

3

A level

Higher

4,5,6 and 7

Foundation degree and above

Degree

6 and 7

Bachelor’s or master’s degree

 

Some apprenticeships may also give you an additional qualification, such as a diploma or professional body qualification

For entry level jobs for new recruits within GP Practices, Pharmacies and Dentist Surgeries.  Apprenticeship Standards including:

Occupations/Roles

 

Customer Services

Level 2 and 3

Business Administration

Level 3

Pharmacist Assistant

Level 3

Pharmacist Services Assistant

Level 2 and 3

Health and Care Support Worker

Level 2

Community Health Support Worker

Level 3

Digital Community Manager

Level 4

Junior Content Producer

Level 3

 

Ongoing training for existing colleagues to support their career development includes:

Occupations/Roles

 

HR Support

Level 3

Assistant Accountant

Level 3

Team Leading and Supervisor

Level 3

Departmental and Operations Manager

Level 5

Senior Leader

Level 7

Senior People Manager

Level 7

Associate Project Manager

Level 4

 

Clinical career pathways have been supported by the provision of Apprenticeships for:

Occupations/Roles

 

Health and Care Support Workers

Level 2 and 3

Nursing Associates

Level 5

Registered Nurse Degree Apprentices

Level 6

Physicians Associate

Level 7

   Advanced Clinical Practitioner

Level 7

 

This process will vary from place to place.  But, the golden rule is to make sure you are clear and focused on the role you are completing the form for!  You’d be amazed how many people cut and paste from a previous application leaving the wrong job title the application.  This will mean you are ruled out before they even consider you.

Make sure you have an up to date professional CV. 

If you need to write a supporting statement – read the person specification and the role and responsibilities and say how you can meet these requirements.  Evidence why and how from your experience in other job roles of school or college experiences.  Be systematic – address all the points highlighting your strengths.

Some employers will show the points that are considered at the application stage and those that will be addressed at interview.  This will give you a guide on how much to write.  DON’T write too much!  2 sides of A4 maximum. 

Think of the application process as the ‘shop window’ share enough to entice the employer to want to enter the shop to find out more.

Functional Skills:  Anyone wanting to do an Apprenticeship at Level 3 or higher needs to be able to evidence they have already achieved English and Maths at Level 2 (GCSE).  This is non-negotiable.  You have to be able to show the authentic, original certificates.  The results transcript is not enough.

Many candidates have achieved these qualifications, they cant find the certificates.  This is not unusual!  Functional Skills courses are available through the local FE colleges, Adult Education Services and private training providers.  You should be able to access free courses as they are Government funded. 

 

Apprentice tuition fees will be paid by your employer.

Every Apprentice is required to evidence they have achieved a Level 2 Qualification in English and Maths before they can complete and achieve an Apprenticeship Standard at Level 3 or higher.

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/2019.01.04-HEE-English-and-Maths-Guidance-v6.pdf

For many colleagues they may have achieved these qualifications but have miss placed the certificates.  This is very common.  In this instance they will be required to resit the functional Skills tests.  No one is exempt.

For colleagues educated over seas the ENIC process to match certificates to UK is one possibility.  HEE offer this matching service.  

From experience Numeracy/Match qualifications are often accepted.  English often requires re-taking.  The test includes - reading, writing and comprehension, speaking and listening.  

Interview Process:

Think of the Interview as the point of sale – would they want to buy your skills, knowledge, behaviours? 

And most importantly would you want to join an organisation that their behaviours, methods, knowledge and skills represent?

Prepare for your interview. 

Everyone (well, almost everyone) gets nervous.  To manage your nerves make sure you are prepared:

Read you application

Check the Job description

Remind yourself of the person specification they have outlined.

Draw up a list of answers to potential questions to show your strengths.

Be prepared to talk about what you need to develop further (no one is fully formed).

Be prepared to say why you think an Apprenticeship will help you and help the organisation.

Even if your interview is online – think about what you choose to wear!  You clothes will have an impact on how you feel and consequently how you sit, speak and how confident you feel. 

If you interview is on line – think about sitting on a chair if possible with your laptop or phone on a table.  Try not to be lying on your bed!! It will make a difference.

Training Providers are expected to gain employer commitment to supporting any Apprentices within their organisation.  In smaller organisations this will usually be the immediate line manager or the Senior Leader.  You should be made aware of who your direct manager is and if you have a buddy or mentor within the organisation.

Employer Responsibilities:

As an Apprentice you  will have much the same needs as any new appointee. 

Your employer will:

  1. Create a welcoming culture.
  2. Introduce you to your colleagues
  3. Give you information about the organisation
  4. Help you to settle into your new role.
  5. Schedule regular 1-2-1s, give you progress feedback and other general observations.
  6. Delegate work to make your apprenticeship manageable.
  7. Communicate with the wider team to set expectations.

Employer commitment statement:

This document  sets out the  scope of the Employer responsibilities. 

The main features for an Apprenticeship are:

  • Providing a safe working environment
  • Ensuring reporting on Health and Safety/Equality and Inclusivity are made clear and accessible
  • Line management and support are explained and understood
  • Time to focus on their study is made available – 20% of paid working time is the minimum requirement

Step 6: : Apprentice Agreement

Individuals embarking on an Apprenticeship are also required to formally express their commitment.

Apprentice Commitment Statement

Again on the Government template the list of responsibilities is outlined –

  • The Apprentice will be proactive and actively engaged in managing their own learning
  • The Apprentice will attend all learning sessions as required by their programme

It is very important that you are familiar with . the Apprenticeship Standard you are signed up to

It is your responsibility to be familiar with the Knowledge, Skills and Behaviors of the identified Apprenticeship Standard and to be actively engaged in covering the full content.  Your Training Provider will guide you through this.

The legal requirement for an Apprentice is to be enabled to spend 20% of their paid working hours to attend to their learning.  This time needs to be allocated in a flexible pattern to suit the delivery of the knowledge and skills. 

How is Off-the-job training defined?

‘learning which is undertaken outside of the normal day to-day working environment and leads towards the achievement of an Apprenticeship.’

The off-the-job training must be directly relevant to the Apprenticeship standard and could include the following:

 

Includes:

 

Off-the-job training does not include

The teaching of theory (for example: lectures, role playing, simulation exercises, online learning or manufacturer training

 

English and maths (up to level 2) which is funded separately

Practical training: shadowing, mentoring, industry visits and attendance at competitions

 

Progress reviews or on-programme assessment needed for an Apprenticeship standard

Learning support and time spent writing assessments/assignments

 

Training which takes place outside the Apprentice’s paid working hours

 

All training providers are required to be registered on the Register of Approved Training Providers   register of training providers - RoATP .  Only providers on this register are entitled to deliver Apprenticeships and receive funding from the Apprenticeship Levy and/or the Education and Skills Funding Agency. 

 

Training providers tend to specialise in industry sectors. 

 

All training providers are rigorously scrutinised by the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills known as OfSTED.  The Education sector’s equivalent of the CQC. 

You need to know:

What your Training Provider is called?

Who is your named contact? 

Who is your Coach?

 

What do you have to do?

Record all your learning on the data system the training provider uses.

Complete all you assignments on time

Attend all workshops

Attend all coaching sessions being prepared with any documents or assignments as required. 

Arrange  progress meetings with you Manager and the Training provider.  Identify the meeting space and  diary invitations as appropriate. 

 

 

 

You will be recommended for the End Point Assessment at an agreed point in your learning process.  This is called the Gateway.

You will need to have evidenced the achievement of all aspects of the Standard, have evidence of having achieved Functional Skills (or equivalent) in English and Math's and the have recorded all your learning hours on your Training Providers data system.

Most Apprenticeship Standards have an externally assessed process to sign off your achievement of all aspects of the skills, knowledge and behaviors.

In some higher level,  Degree Apprenticeships have integrated assessment processes.

End Point Assessment organisations are required to be independent of the training providers.  As with the training providers each organisation needs to be on the approved register of EPAs:

Each Apprenticeship Standard has its own format for this assessment process.  Typically, it will include a presentation on an aspect of the programme.  This is a chance for you to demonstrate your development and learning.  This may be based on your portfolio of evidence drawn from all the activities you have experienced.  

Some assessments include a multiple choice questions test, some practical scenarios to demonstrate how the candidate would approach the task.

Most include a professional discussion with an expert for the field to explore the work the candidate is involved in.  It’s a moment where you can ‘show off’ your skill, knowledge and behaviors and how far you have journeyed!

You will be required to pass all aspects of the assessment to be able successfully achieve the Apprenticeship.

There is the opportunity to achieve a Merit or Distinction as a pass grade.

 

Training Hubs

Apprenticeships in Primary Care

The NHS has been a prime contributor to the development of Apprenticeships across many sectors.  Contributing the development of Apprenticeship Standards as diverse as Business Administration, Team Leading, data analysis, Peer Support Worker and the health sector related Standards – Health Care Support Worker, Nursing, Occupational Health , Clinical Coding and many more.

In many cases the developments have been driven by our colleagues in the larger NHS organisations, Hospital Trusts and Health Education England.  The needs of Primary Care have been represented.  It is however important that this focus is maintained and explored when selecting and working with a training provider. 

The role of a colleague in Primary Care although it may have the same name as a role in an Hospital Trust it  is most often radically different to that of a colleague working in a Hospital Trust.  The delivery of the training, the content  and  the support needs to reflect this difference. 

 

Where to start:

Enquiries from colleagues across the Primary Care sector come from  Practice Managers, GPs or individuals already working in a GP Surgery.

For the Practice Manager the impetus for their enquiry  is most often a colleague having left their organisation and the search for a replacement – like for like.

This can present an opportunity for you to encourage some reflection on the revised skill set they may be seeking and opportunities to offer development for colleagues who remain.

Step 1 – Clarifying the job role

Any Apprentice requires a JD that clearly sets out the role and responsibilities.  This content will guide the selection of Apprenticeship Standard.   The job role requires enough scope for the candidate to experience all the Skills and Knowledge to be able to complete and achieve the Apprenticeship Standard. 

Training Providers will ask for clearly written JDs.  They may also suggest amendments to ensure a good fit with the knowledge, skills and behaviours required by the Apprenticeship Standard. 

Step 2 – Research and select a suitable Training Provider

From your experience and the feedback from the Apprenticeship Leads peer group  select and offer employers the choice of 2 to 3 training provider options..

It can sometimes be helpful to guide this choice, it is however important that the employer makes the final selection.  The style of a training provider needs to meet the needs of the employer.  It’s a relationship, as with all relationships there is a personal element that requires consideration. 

To find a Training Provider – first select the Apprenticeship Standard you need to be delivered and then click the find a training provider button on the right hand side of the page.

https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/apprenticeship-standards/?

For example - the following link will take you to the Nursing Associate Apprenticeship Standard.  On the left hand side of the page - Find a Training Provider

Training providers for Nursing associate (NMC 2018) (level 5) (education.gov.uk)

Advertising  the Apprenticeship for new recruits

Having selected the training provider they can be asked to support the advertisement of the role.

The employer will be required to sign up to the Apprenticeship Service – 

This will allow the role to be posted on Find an Apprenticeship.gov.uk   

https://www.gov.uk/apply-apprenticeship

Selecting the candidate

If the employer is recruiting a younger  candidate they may need to adjust their interview style and questions to be altered to recognise limited or no workplace experience

Performance Management

In some cases you may need to support the employer in designing a suitable induction and performance management process.  The training providers will often get involved at this stage.  They will be looking for a positive relationship between the Manager, the Apprentice and themselves.  In this way the feed back on progress and next steps can become a natural part of everyday. 

The direct manager of the Apprentice will be made aware of the responsibilities contained in the Employer Commitment Statement.

When an Apprenticeship Standard is approved for delivery they are assigned an agreed cash value.  This is based on the activity and content of the Standard and is signed off by the Minister for Education. All Apprenticeship Standards are developed via a Trailblazer group made up if industry specialists, curriculum experts, training providers and members of the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education.  The industry specialists, employers being the main influence guiding the content and various levels of the Standard. The assigned value is the total amount of funding that can be drawn down for the delivery of an Apprenticeship.  If for any reason a training provider wishes to charge more the additional fee will need to be funded from a different source.

Government Guidance on Funding for Apprenticeships

Tuition fees:

The agreed value includes the tuition fee and approximately 20% of this total is expected to be used to cover the cost of the End Point Assessment. 

The tuition fees for Levy payers:

Government guidance on the Apprenticeship Levy

If your organisation has a pay roll in excess of £3 million per annum you will be paying this tax.  This will be held in an account for your organisation to deploy when your current or new colleagues embark on an Apprenticeship. 

Apprenticeship Levy:

The Apprenticeship levy affects UK employers in all sectors with an annual pay bill in excess of £3 million. It is estimated that less than 2% of UK businesses are subject to the levy. All businesses with a UK pay bill above £3,000,000 per annum are required to pay the levy, regardless of whether they make use of the funding available for apprenticeships.

The levy is charged at a rate of 0.5% of an employer’s full UK pay bill and will be paid to the HMRC through the PAYE process alongside tax and NICs.

Levy Paying Employers

Your organisation will have calculated whether it needs to pay the levy, and will have included it in the usual PAYE payment to HMRC.

To be able to pay for apprenticeships your organisation also needs to register for the Digital Apprenticeship Service to manage apprenticeship funds online. An employer is able to pay for apprenticeship training and assessment via this account. The government will apply a 10% top-up to the funds you have deposited in your account.

If you don’t have enough funds in your account to pay for apprenticeship training, you must pay 5% of any outstanding balance. The government will pay the remaining 95%, up to the funding band maximum allocated to the apprenticeship you have chosen. If you exceed the funding band maximum, you will need to pay all the additional costs.

Tuition fees for smaller organisations/employers who do not pay the Levy

Smaller organisations, that do not pay the Apprenticeship Levy share the cost of training and assessing their apprentices with the government. This is called ‘co-investment’. As a smaller employer, you can pay for apprenticeships by registering with the Digital Apprenticeship Service and creating an account. The government is aiming that all employers regardless of size, should be registered on the Apprenticeship Service by early 2021.

For new apprenticeships you pay 5% towards the cost of apprenticeship training. The government will pay the rest (95%) up to the maximum funding band of the apprenticeship you have chosen. Should the cost exceed the funding band maximum, the additional cost will need to be paid by your organisation. You will pay 5% contribution to your training provider over the duration of the apprenticeship training.

Levy Sharing:

In some instances you maybe  be able to arrange a Levy Sharing Partner to pay the tuition fees.

This can be done by contacting HEE – Jennifer Stone (Jennifer.stone@hee.nhs.net and forwarding the Levy Support Request form.

Levy Request Form

The critical Apprenticeship Service ID is generated by each employer logging on and creating an account.

Guidance for logging onto the Apprenticeship Service

National Insurance savings

All employers are exempt from paying employer class 1 National Insurance contributions for apprentices under the age of 25 on earnings below £827 a week (or £43,000 per annum). For example, this means that employers who have an apprentice aged 21 to 24 paid at real living wage would save around £2,000 in National Insurance contributions over the course of a 12-month apprenticeship.

To be eligible for exemption, your apprentice must be on a government approved apprenticeship standard.

Training costs for small employers:

If your organisation has less than 50 employees, it could be eligible for additional funding and support.

Employing an apprentice who is aged 16 to 18, or an apprentice aged 19 to 24 who is a care leaver or has an EHCP, will enable your organisation to 100% of your training costs will be paid by the government.

Employer Incentives:

Different incentive payments are available from time to time.

Currently  (September 2021) all employers regardless of size, will receive £3,000 for taking on an apprentice that is new to the organisation.

Employers will receive this payment in two instalments via your training provider who receive the instalments from the government and then forward on. The first payment will be available after the apprentice has completed 90 days of the apprenticeship and the second instalment will be available after the apprentices has completed 365 days.

Apprenticeship Service

These payments are made after you add new apprentices to your Apprenticeship Service (AS) account. Eligibility criteria for the payments for your apprentice will vary and you must have registered for a AS account. Guidance on signing up for the Apprenticeship Service.  This service was once known as the Digital Apprenticeship Service – DAS.  The Apprentice’s email address is required when setting up this account. 

You’ll receive the payment in 2 equal instalments: 50% after the apprentice completes 90 days of their apprenticeship and the remaining 50% after 365 days. To get the full payment, the apprenticeship must last for at least one year. The payment is different to apprenticeship levy funds and you can spend it on anything to support your organisation’s costs.

There will be no limit on the number of incentive payments that an employer can claim for apprentices eligible to receive funding, provided each apprentice meets the criteria, including being a new employee.

Every Apprentice is required to evidence they have achieved a Level 2 Qualification in English and Maths before they can complete and achieve an Apprenticeship Standard at Level 3 or higher.

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/2019.01.04-HEE-English-and-Maths-Guidance-v6.pdf

For many colleagues they may have achieved these qualifications but have miss placed the certificates.  This is very common.  In this instance they will be required to resit the functional Skills tests.  No one is exempt.

For colleagues educated over seas the ENIC process to match certificates to UK is one possibility.  HEE offer this matching service.  

From experience Numeracy/Match qualifications are often accepted.  English often requires re-taking.  The test includes - reading, writing and comprehension, speaking and listening.  

Feedback – Keeping in touch

Supporting Apprentices:

Training Providers will often have established feedback processes for anyone on an Apprenticeship programme.

This is one of the expectations set out by OfSTED. 

Aspects covered include:

Health and Wellbeing – including Safeguarding

Progress against learning mile stones. 

Readiness for the end point assessment.

You may find it interesting to have this feed back as you’ll be able to build up a data base of good training providers. 

Supporting Employers :

Employers may need on-going support with the management of their Apprentice.

A representative of the employer is expected to participated in the regular meetings between the training provider and the Apprentice.  Known as the tri-partite meetings.  You may have the time to get involved if there is anything of concern that you have been alerted to.

Training Providers may also get involved with supporting employers on some of the following:

Techniques for the positive performance management of colleagues on an Apprenticeship may need discussion.

Relationships in the workplace have their ups and downs.  Managing colleagues on a learning journey are not the immune.  For the employer to benefit from having an Apprentice their active engagement in supporting their Apprentice is essential. 

Employers should be encouraged to support the design of tasks and projects  for the Apprentice .  This does two things, makes sure they are able to cover the content of the Standard and allows some active direction towards tasks that will add value to the business. 

Next steps and careers:

A good training provider will discuss next steps and progress with the Apprentice.  Employers will often be considering the value to their organisation 

Health Education and Talent for Care 

https://www.hee.nhs.uk/our-work/apprenticeships

Institute for Apprenticeships and technical education and skills - Standards, Providers, End Point Assessment Organisations

https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/apprenticeship-standards/?

News and policy updates

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/

Weblinks for Employers and Apprentices

Topic

Website/Link 

HASO  Tool Kit

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/toolkit/

Find an Apprenticeship Standard

https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/ap prenticeship-standards/?

Apprenticeship Standard – Academic Levels

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/news/getting -to-grips-with-levels/

Employer Information

 

Benefits from taking on an Apprentice

https://www.apprenticeships.gov.uk/employers /benefits-of-hiring-apprentice    

NHS Employers

https://www.nhsemployers.org/articles/whatapprenticeships-are-and-how-use-them

 

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/govern ment/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/ file/800060/Achieving_the_benefits_of_appre nticeships.pdf

To small business

https://www.fsb.org.uk/resources-page/6benefits-of-an-apprenticeship-for-a-smallbusiness.html

Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education

https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/ab out/

Employers Advice and Guidance

https://www.gov.uk/employing-an-apprentice

Top Tips for Employers in Primary Care

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/wpcontent/uploads/2019/02/2019.02.21-Primarycare-top-tips-employers.pdf

Apprenticeship Funding – DfEd rules

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/a pprenticeship-funding

 

https://www.gov.uk/employing-anapprentice/get-funding

 

 

To create an employer account on the digital apprenticeship service

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/manageapprenticeship-funds

 

To research apprenticeships currently being advertised in your area: Find an apprenticeship

 

To view government guides on apprenticeships

Apprenticeship Levy

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/payapprenticeship-levy

Find a Training Provider

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/r egister-of-training-organisations

Recruiting an Apprentice

https://www.gov.uk/apply-apprenticeship

 

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/how-to-take-onan-apprentice

Managing an Apprentice

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/govern ment/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/ file/800061/Supporting_young_apprentices.pd f

Mentoring your Apprentice

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/news/welco me-to-our-apprenticeship-chat-series/

Employer commitment

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/a pprenticeship-commitment-statement-template

Apprentice Commitment Statement

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/a pprenticeship-commitment-statement-template

End Point Assessment Organisations

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/register-of-endpoint-assessment-organisations

Apprenticeship Chat Series

 

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/webresources/

 

Presentation Topic

Links

Apprenticeship Standards

Find presentation here

Functional Skills

Find presentation here

Recruiting and Apprentice

Find presentation here

Training Providers – What good looks like

Find presentation here

Employer Role

 

Find presentation here

20% Off the job – Myths and Facts

Find presentation here

Money and Funding

Find presentation here

 Weblinks for Apprentices

Topic

Website/Link

HASO  Tool Kit

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/toolkit/

Tips for Apprentices

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/wp-

content/uploads/2019/02/2019.02.21-Primary-care-top-tipsapprentices.pdf

A career in Health Care

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/wp-

content/uploads/2019/02/2019.02.20-apprenticeshipinfographic.pdf

FAQs for Apprentices

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/wp-

content/uploads/2019/02/2019.02.20-apprentice-faqs.pdf

Am I ready?

https://haso.skillsforhealth.org.uk/news/am-i-ready-how-do-iapply-for-an-apprenticeship/

Find an Apprenticeship Standard

https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/apprenticeship-

Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education

https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/about/

Benefits to becoming an Apprentice

https://www.apprenticeships.gov.uk/apprentices/benefitsapprenticeship#

Disadvantages

https://www.careeraddict.com/apprenticeships-pros-cons

Office for Students – Higher

Education – Degree Apprenticeships

https://www.officeforstudents.org.uk/advice-andguidance/skills-and-employment/degree-apprenticeships/

 

To research apprenticeships currently being advertised in your area: Find an apprenticeship

 

To view government guides on apprenticeships

Apprentice Commitment Statement

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/apprenticeshipcommitment-statement-template

End Point Assessment

https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/apprenticeship-

Presentation Topic

Links

 

Apprenticeship Standards

Find presentation here

 

Functional Skills

Find presentation here

 

Recruiting and Apprentice

Find presentation here

Training Providers – What good looks like

Find presentation here

 

Employer Role

 

Find presentation here

 

20% Off the job – Myths and Facts

Find presentation here

 

Money and Funding

Find presentation here

 

Glossary

Term

Meaning

Academic Level

Refers to the academic level the Apprenticeship content is designed to reflect - Level 2 (GCSE)  basic foundation through to Level 7 Masters Degree level

Apprenticeship

A programme of study closely related to the job an individual is employed to carry out.

Apprenticeship Standard

The qualification/s that the Apprentice will achieve through their study and experience in the job role they are employed to carry out. Written by employers from the industry sectors in order that they reflect up to date practice, skills knowledge and behaviours required to be successful in a job role.

Assessor

A suitable qualified and experienced individual who can judge the practice and knowledge of the candidate.

Buddy

Usually a co-worker who is a non-judgemental source of support and guidance.

Cap Value

The total cash value for an Apprenticeship Standard that can be paid for via the ESFA or the Levy- proposed by the Trailblazer group and agreed by the IfATE and the Minister at the DfE.  Any additional costs above this value need to be met separately by the employer.

Co- Funding

SME, non-Levy payers are expected to make a 5% contribution to the cost of an Apprenticeship Standard.  95% will be paid by the ESFA (Government) to the choice of Training Provider.

Coach

This individual appointed by the selected Training Provider works with the Apprentice to ensure they cover the full content of the Apprenticeship Standard and know, understand and can do all the required activities and tasks.   They will usually have recent or current experience from the industry sector and acts as a subject matter expert.  They are usually the Training Provider representative at the Tri-Partite progress meetings.

Commitment Statement

It is a legal requirement that the employer of an Apprentices signs a statement acknowledging their role and responsibilities to supporting the training of an Apprentice.

Contract

All Apprentices are employed.  As such they are required to have a contract of employment setting out their terms and conditions.  These terms and conditions should be the same as  the policy all employees within the company at the same level and duration.

Curriculum

Curriculum refers to the content of the Apprenticeship Standard.

DfE

Department for Education

EAPO

End Point Assessment Organisation

Employed

Appointed to a job role within the employing organisation with a contract setting out the terms and conditions.

Employer contributions

The SME employer with an apprentice over 24  years old maybe expected to contribute 5% of the agreed tuition costs of an Apprenticeship.

Employer Grants

There are a range of incentive payments or employer grants that are made from time to time.  Employers taking on an Apprentice 16-18 years old (or up to 24 years old with an Care Leavers Plan) can currently expect a modest grant of £3000 per candidate.  These payments are subject to regular change.

End Point Assessment - EPA

End  Point Assessment is the independent process carried out once and Apprentice has reached the Gate way, having covered and experience all the skills, knowledge and behaviours required by the Standard.  They will also be required to evidence having achieved Maths and English at Level 2.

ESFA

Education and Skills Funding Agency

External Placements

Apprentices are required to experience all aspects contained within the Standard.  In some instances this requires work placements in a range of settings external to their place of employment. 

Functional Skills

English and Maths at Level 2.  All Apprentices are required to achieve these in advance of embarking on an Apprenticeship at Level 3 or higher. 

HEI

Higher Education Institute - University

IfATE

Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education and Skills

ILR

Individual Learner Record

Levy

Apprenticeship tax paid for by employing organisations with a payroll in excess of £3m per annum.

Levy Share Partner

Employers with a payroll of £3m plus pay the Apprenticeship Levy at 0.5%.  This tax is held in an Apprenticeship Account.  These monies can be used to 'buy' Apprenticeship training from an approved Apprenticeship training provider from the RoATP.  These employers are able to share up to 25% of their accrued accounts with other employers. Within the NHS many Trusts have significant surpluses and they are very willing to share this funding with other members of the NHS family. The Trusts are often referred to as a Levy Share Partner.

Line Manager

This is the person within the employing organisation that has direct responsibility for the Apprentices work or task organisation and performance management.

London Living wage

This refers to the agreed hourly rate that is considered to reflect the cash amount that an individual can live on in the Greater London Area. https://www.trustforlondon.org.uk/issues/work/london-living-wage/

Manager

This may be the same person as the  line manager.  In some instances there may be a chain of management and this person may be a more senior colleague.

Minimum Wage

The legal minimum hourly rate to be paid by employers to employees. https://www.gov.uk/national-minimum-wage-rates

OfQUAL

The Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (Ofqual)

OfSTED

Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills

OTJT

Off the job training - All Apprentices are entitled to 20% of paid working time to engage with the learning and study required to successfully achieve the Apprenticeship they are enrolled on.

Professional Body

Professional membership organisations which often have their own qualifications that represent the industry standards.  Examples include: CIPD, ATA, NMC, CMI, ILM

RoATP

Register of Apprenticeship Training Providers

Supervisor

A member of the employer team that is qualified within an appropriate skill set to oversee and feedback on the skill , Knowledge and behaviour development of an Apprentice.

Training Provider

The organisation selected to deliver and support the training of an Apprentice.  These can be Further Education Colleges, Independent Training Providers, Universities.

Tri partite meeting

The regular - every 12 weeks - to check on the progress and development of an Apprentice. The manager or suitable employer representative, the Apprentice and the training provider representative are required to reflect on progress to date and plan future tasks.